Geology

November 6, 2018
Mastodon Femur with Skeleton

The Mastodon femur recently put back on display at the Museum of Natural History, was found in Middle River, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. This bone has a big history!

Big Sandy

The huge bone was discovered by a Alexander McRae in 1834. Alexander's nick-name was "Big Sandy". We don't know if the Mastodon was a male or female, and it was found along the banks of the river, so Big Sandy might be a good nick-name for this historic femur.

July 19, 2018
3D digital model captures the details of the ‘dinosaur’ footprints that cover a surface of a sandstone boulder that is 200 million years old.

By: Dr. Tim Fedak, Acting Curator of Geology, Nova Scotia Museum

 

Nova Scotia is becoming known globally as an innovative centre in the use of 3D visualization for research and industrial projects. 

A small workshop was held at the Nova Scotia Museum in May that highlighted several 3D digitization projects.

January 12, 2018
Research Camera Captures Cliff Collapse

 

By: Tim Fedak, Acting Curator of Geology, and Regan Maloney, Fundy Geological Museum.

The phenomenal power of the Bay of Fundy tides is one of the great wonders of the world. Twice a day 160 billion tons of water flow in and out of the Bay of Fundy. The tremendous amount of water causes regular coastal erosion.